Angry Birds and many games freemium collect data without transparency

When it is free, it is you the product. The well-known saying that also applies to many free games, such as the series of Angry Birds which uses the data of the players for targeted advertising. We may not like the claims, but there is nothing particularly shocking : as the most publishers of games freemium, Rovio incorporates in his productions of tools that allow third parties to collect data on users.



The Finnish software list on its website, the 43 partners who collect these information, among which are 14 intermediate advertising. Vox reports that three of them violate certainly the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA, a u.s. law enacted in 1998 to protect the privacy of children on the internet) : MoPub, a platform in pubs Twitter ; AdMob: Google’s ironSource, a corporation of adware. Legal actions are underway against those governed.


A study conducted by researchers from the university of california, Berkeley around the apps aimed at children has shown that 66% of them shared unique identifiers persistent with third parties. However, children under the age of 13 are not supposed to be followed to the trace of the so. Rovio assures not to use that id advertising réinitialisables provided by Apple and Google, but Angry Birds was part of apps collecting the persistent identifier…


Placed in front of the evidence, a spokesperson for Rovio has explained that the company preferred to avoid integration kits for third-party development in its games, real black boxes through which pass all sorts of data. The company says despite all that sometimes, there is no other solution. The biggest problem in this whole story, it is that the editor does not know the exact nature of the data shared with advertisers and platforms pub. It is certainly not the only one…

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